How Beauty Standards Have Changed Over The Last 100 Years

Beauty standards are a weird thing...

Beauty standards are a weird thing. They seem to change from decade to decade, which pretty much means that someone that we find attractive now, might become someone that no longer is considered attractive in ten, fifteen years. Of course, the opposite can also apply, so I guess there’s always hope.

To keep up with the changes, let’s take a look at the ways in which beauty standards have changed in the last 100 years.

The 1910s

A little over a century ago, the most attractive female form was the “Gibson Girl”. They got their name from Charles Dana Gibson, an illustrator that drew the female form and because of it somehow single-handedly decided the beauty standards for an entire decade. 

1910 | How Beauty Standards Have Changed Over The Last 100 Years | Zestradar

The 1920s

The roaring twenties toned the beauty standards down a notch. Flapper girls, as they were called, were the ultimate form of beauty in that decade. They were mostly defined by their short haircuts, short skirts, interest in Jazz music and being somewhat rebellious in nature. 

1920 | How Beauty Standards Have Changed Over The Last 100 Years | Zestradar

The 1930s

After the curvy Gibson Girls and the somewhat more normal-looking Flapper girls, the 30s welcomed back curves in the female beauty standards. This is when the first typical “blond bombshells” start showing up on the silver screen.

1930 | How Beauty Standards Have Changed Over The Last 100 Years | Zestradar

The 1940s

Stop me if you’re seeing a pattern here, but a decade after the curvier bombshells hit the silver screen, beauty standards shifted back to skinnier girls. The so-called “screen queens”, think Katherine Hepburn, were the ultimate beauty standard for women in that decade.

1940 | How Beauty Standards Have Changed Over The Last 100 Years | Zestradar